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Thread: 153 Volt DC dangerous on a motor bike?

              
   
   
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    Senior Member ardhout's Avatar
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    Question 153 Volt DC dangerous on a motor bike?

    My battery pack is made of 48s2p 16A batteries, so the total voltage is 153 Volts.

    My question is, because I'm sitting on a metal motor bike, is this voltage dangerous?

    Who has experience with getting a shock from 72V, 96V or 144Volt?
    Last edited by ardhout; 31 March 2012 at 0258.
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    Senior Member billmi's Avatar
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    The battery pack has enough voltage to arc, and enough amperage to arc weld steel so, yes it is dangerous. Care must be taken when working with it.

    Consider also though, that the wiring between the coils and spark plugs on an internal combustion bike carries a few thousand volts (albeit at very low amperage - but still, a stray arc could ignite gasoline vapors).
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    Quote Originally Posted by ardhout View Post
    My battery pack is made of 48s2p 16A batteries, so the total voltage is 153 Volts.

    My question is, because I'm sitting on a metal motor bike, is this voltage dangerous?

    Who has experience with getting a shock from 72V, 96V or 144Volt?
    I just went over and touched a 48V battery's terminals. Dry fingers-nothing. Spit wet fingers-very little tingle. I've been hit by 130VDC sweaty arm and hand. That was unpleasant, but not really painful. One time, took a 350VDC hit. That hurt a lot but no real damage.

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    Senior Member ardhout's Avatar
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    Thanks, but what about touching 153V DC? Is it less dangerous then touching 230VAC? I heard that DC is in principle more dangerous as AC, because it 'freezes' muscle movement so that it will be difficult or impossible to release a 'live' object. It also burns more because of flame arcs.

    I still have to assemble all the batteries so after adding up , in the end the voltage will be too high to touch.
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    Senior Member ardhout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lugnut View Post
    ...that was unpleasant, but not really painful. One time, took a 350VDC hit. That hurt a lot but no real damage.
    Thanks for sharing the experience.. Not so worried anymore
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    Moderator Nuts & Volts's Avatar
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    I've had about a 80V touch and it tingles. Just use a bunch of plastic/rubber covers for all of the HV connections. I've also worked some with a 400V+ system, its dangerous, but so far no incidents.
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    Senior Member ARC EV Racing's Avatar
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    Personally I don't feel anything until about 90 - 100 VDC, although I've seen Brendan jump when coming into contact with a 48V pack so I guess it's down to the individual. In any event by the time you're making a circuit across pack voltage something's gone wrong. Better to work on the principle that it's potentially very dangerous and treat it accordingly.

    As Billmi said, watch out for the arc. Even low voltage is dangerous if you start short circuiting it with tools etc.

    We have a 750VDC third rail on some areas of our railway network and I've had the experience of having to step over live sections, which isn't much fun. You're a gonner if you touch that.

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    Senior Member ardhout's Avatar
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    And what will happen if the +wire of the battery touches the metal motor frame?
    Any problem while driving it?
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    Senior Member dice23's Avatar
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    you should try getting hit by 333 volts...lmao...ouch! i've learned to cover things a little better these days as i'm not liking hv touches anymore...lol. i think its been a common ritual of mine to get wacked by every pack ive had in the bike,starting out at 144v!

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